Sharing Your Creative Process


and Why it Helps Your Clients

by Gary Powell

Shenandoah DVD CoverEither as a film composer or commercial composer, it will help your clients learn to depend on you more if you share your creative process with them. If you don’t, they will most certainly think of your job as just magic or even worse, nothing but talent or luck. If you are composing or writing for sophisticated buyers of creative arts, it is likely they already have experience with talent and especially fame, something that is wearing very thin. I like to think that every note I write is defendable in front of a panel of my peers.

The most common question I hear is, “where does your inspiration come from?” The opening scene in the great 1965 Civil War movie Shenandoah has actor Jimmy Stewart as the father saying grace over his very large family’s dinner table. Each bow their head in concert as the father speaks in a plain tone, “We thank you Lord for these here vittles. We wouldn’t ah had ’em if we hadn’t ah worked for ’em, but we’d like to thank you anyway. Amen.” Like the good farmer we also have a similar relationship to our art even though our study and labor yield a different fruit.

Share your process with your clients. It will reassure them and teach them that you can duplicate your high standards on call every time.

It does not serve us professionally to pretend our creativity is bestowed upon us from nowhere. My inspiration comes from my continuing education, risk, trial and error, rule-breaking adventures, listening, making mistakes and gestation. After all the components of any upcoming creative project are known, time will certainly deliver the answer if we’ve done our part and our labor. Share your process with your clients. It will reassure them and teach them that you can duplicate your high standards on call every time. Each of us garage cognitive and creative processes that are unique and even though we each employ different tools, the music’s effectiveness will always depend on both our discipline and our patience. We wouldn’t have it if we hadn’t worked for it, but I’d like to say “thank you anyway” to Jimmy Stewart and beyond. Amen.

(TheShenandoah Poster is used here under the Copyright Law of Fair Use for Educational Purposes.)
All Content of Gary Powell’s Site is Licensed Under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 License
.

by Gary Powell

Shenandoah DVD CoverEither as a film composer or commercial composer, it will help your clients learn to depend on you more if you share your creative process with them. If you don’t, they will most certainly think of your job as just magic or even worse, nothing but talent or luck. If you are composing or writing for sophisticated buyers of creative arts, it is likely they already have experience with talent and especially fame, something that is wearing very thin. I like to think that every note I write is defendable in front of a panel of my peers.

The most common question I hear is, “where does your inspiration come from?” The opening scene in the great 1965 Civil War movie Shenandoah has actor Jimmy Stewart as the father saying grace over his very large family’s dinner table. Each bow their head in concert as the father speaks in a plain tone, “We thank you Lord for these here vittles. We wouldn’t ah had ’em if we hadn’t ah worked for ’em, but we’d like to thank you anyway. Amen.” Like the good farmer we also have a similar relationship to our art even though our study and labor yield a different fruit.

Share your process with your clients. It will reassure them and teach them that you can duplicate your high standards on call every time.

It does not serve us professionally to pretend our creativity is bestowed upon us from nowhere. My inspiration comes from my continuing education, risk, trial and error, rule-breaking adventures, listening, making mistakes and gestation. After all the components of any upcoming creative project are known, time will certainly deliver the answer if we’ve done our part and our labor. Share your process with your clients. It will reassure them and teach them that you can duplicate your high standards on call every time. Each of us garage cognitive and creative processes that are unique and even though we each employ different tools, the music’s effectiveness will always depend on both our discipline and our patience. We wouldn’t have it if we hadn’t worked for it, but I’d like to say “thank you anyway” to Jimmy Stewart and beyond. Amen.

(TheShenandoah Poster is used here under the Copyright Law of Fair Use for Educational Purposes.)
All Content of Gary Powell’s Site is Licensed Under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 License
.

3 thoughts on “

Sharing Your Creative Process


and Why it Helps Your Clients”
  1. Right on! Not only will sharing your methods reassure your clients, it will give them new insights about how to work better with you, taking the collaboration to the next level.

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